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Five cops who were involved in death of Breonna Taylor also took part in botched 2018 raid

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Five of the Louisville police officers involved in the controversial raid that left Breonna Taylor dead also participated in a botched raid in 2018 that left a family ‘traumatized,’ it has been revealed.

Mario Daugherty, his girlfriend Ashlea Burr, and their two children, then ages 13 and 14, were at home when cops burst through their door and fired flash bangs on a search warrant, according to Vice News.

According to the search warrant, officers had received a complaint that marijuana was being grown and sold out of Daugherty’s house.

The raid recovered only a small amount of marijuana, however, and no evidence of intent to sell. According to Daughtery’s attorney, the individuals named in the search warrant were previous residents who lived there before him. Daugherty was never charged.

Mario Daugherty, his girlfriend Ashlea Burr (with him above), and their two children, then ages 13 and 14, were at home when cops burst through their door and fired flash bangs

According to the search warrant, officers had received a complaint that marijuana was being grown and sold out of Daugherty’s house – but no charges were ever brought

At least five of the officers involved in the raid would go on to take part in Breonna Taylor’s case, according to Vice.

Officers Brett Hankison, Myles Cosgrove, Mike Campbell, Mike Nobles were present for the execution of the raid on Taylor’s home, and Joshua Jaynes requested the search warrant. 

Hankison has since been fired. His termination letter says he ‘displayed an extreme indifference to human life’ during the raid on Taylor’s home.

Daugherty sued the city in October 2019, calling attention to ‘no-knock’ police raid tactics.

Although the warrant used to search his home was not a no-knock, bodycam video of the raid shows that police burst through the front door with a battering ram as they simultaneously shouted ‘Police! Search warrant!’ 

‘It was just so loud and it just caught everybody off guard nobody knew what was really going on,’ Daugherty told WHAS-TV in June. ‘I thought I was actually ready to be killed that day.’ 

Although the warrant used to search his home was not a no-knock, bodycam video of the raid shows that police burst through the front door with a battering ram

Bodycam footage shows the raid on the family’s home in October 2018

The family says they were left ‘traumatized’ by the raid and later sued the city

‘It was just so loud and it just caught everybody off guard nobody knew what was really going on,’ said Daugherty, seen above with Burr

‘By the time I came through, [Daugherty] was on the floor and I had some kids screaming on the steps and it was just chaos,’ Burr said. 

One of Daugherty’s daughters, who was 14 at the time, ran out the back of the house thinking they were being robbed as SWAT members broke through the door. 

Officers found her in the alley behind her house, in the rain, and yelling at her with guns drawn to get on the ground. 

Now, Daugherty says he wishes the city had taken his lawsuit seriously and reformed police raid practices before Taylor’s death.

Taylor, a paramedic, was shot eight times after officers used a battering ram to knock down her door while serving a search warrant and returned fire into the apartment after midnight on March 13. 

One officer was shot by Taylor’s boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, who said he thought an intruder was breaking into the home. 

The target of the warrant was an alleged drug dealer named Jamarcus Glover, who was arrested on trafficking charges the same night 10 miles away on a separate warrant. Taylor had a previous relationship with Glover. 

Sgt. Johnathan Mattingly, who was shot in the leg by Walker, spoke to Louisville Police internal investigators about two weeks after the raid, and said that police expected Taylor to be alone in the house because Glover was known to be elsewhere.

Taylor (above), an EMT in Louisville, died as police returned fire at her boyfriend while executing a search warrant in a drug investigation of her ex-boyfriend Jamarcus Glover

Mattingly said ahead of the raid officers were told Taylor’s ground floor apartment was a ‘soft target’ and Taylor ‘should be there alone, because they knew where their target was and I guess they thought that he was her only boyfriend or only acquaintance.’ 

Mattingly told investigators in the interview recording that officers briefed on the raid were told Glover had packages sent to her apartment in her name.

Taylor ‘possibly held dope for him, received the packages and held his money,’ Mattingly said he was told of Taylor’s involvement. No drugs were found at Taylor’s home.

Taylor’s death, along with the in-custody death of George Floyd in Minnesota, set off months of protests, as well as a call for the officers who shot Taylor to be criminally charged. 

Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron is currently leading an investigation into Taylor’s death.

Cameron revealed earlier this month that he´s waiting for information on ballistics tests being conducted by the FBI.  

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