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Dyslexic woman reveals what it is REALLY like to live with the disorder with TikTok challenge

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Dyslexic woman reveals what it is REALLY like to live with the disorder – as she challenges TikTok users to read a simulated passage with scrambled words that appear to jump around

  • Lindsay Fleming, a licensed therapist who works with children and teens, shared her dyslexia reading challenge on TikTok 
  • She asked viewers to try and read a simulated passage in which the words are scrambled and appear to be jumping around 
  • Dyslexia is generally defined as a learning difficulty that affects the skills involved in accurate and fluent word reading and spelling
  • It is associated with difficulties in reading, writing, spelling, and organization
  • Fleming noted in the video that ‘dyslexia is on a spectrum and the severity varies from person to person’ 

By Erica Tempesta For Dailymail.com

Published: | Updated:

A woman who was diagnosed with dyslexia when she was six years old has revealed what it really looks like when she reads in an eye-opening TikTok video.

Lindsay Fleming, a licensed therapist who works with children and teens, shared her dyslexia reading challenge on TikTok, asking viewers to try and read a simulated passage in which the words are scrambled and appear to be jumping around. 

‘Have you ever wondered what it’s like for someone who’s dyslexic to read in a classroom?’ she asked at the start of the clip. ‘Well, I’m a licensed therapist, and I have a challenge for you to find out what it’s like.’  

Going viral: Lindsay Fleming, a licensed therapist who was diagnosed with dyslexia as a child, shared her dyslexia reading challenge on TikTok

Fleming challenged TikTokers to duet the video as they attempt to read the passage, noting that ‘dyslexia is on a spectrum and the severity varies from person to person.’

As part of her demonstration, she used a web code created by Swedish web developer Victor Widell. 

The code keeps the first and last letter in each word the same, but jumbles up the letters in the middle to make it appear as if the letters are moving in and out of place. 

Dyslexia occurs in at least one in 10 people, affecting more than 700 million children and adults worldwide, according to Dyslexia International

What it’s like: She asked viewers to try and read a simulated passage in which the words are scrambled and appear to be jumping around

Eye-opening: The simulation keeps the first and last letter in each word the same, but jumbles up the letters in the middle to make it appear as if the letters are moving in and out of place

However, the effect isn’t the same for everyone. Dyslexia has a number of different definitions and descriptions, but it is generally defined as a learning difficulty that affects the skills involved in accurate and fluent word reading and spelling. 

It is associated with difficulties in reading, writing, spelling, and organization, which affects not only academic success but also self-esteem and social-emotional development. 

Some people have more extreme dyslexia, and some have less, as viewers noted in the comments of Fleming’s video. 

Struggling: Many people who took on her challenge stumbled over words and gave up halfway, with one TikTok user named Claire asking: ‘Are these even words?’

Almost: TikTok user @zombikitty6 started off well, but then began stumbling over her words

Many people who took on her challenge stumbled over words and gave up halfway, with one TikTok user named Claire asking: ‘Are these even words?’   

Another young woman who was diagnosed with dyslexia when she was five years old also had a difficult time.  

‘Too big of a word,’ she said as she tried to read the passage. ‘I lost where I am…I give up.’  

Lindsay told BuzzFeed News that the video depicts what reading is like for her.

‘My eyes jump from different lines while reading. I struggle to read words that I fully understand the meaning of when stated out loud,’ she explained. 

Too real: Another young woman who was diagnosed with dyslexia when she was five years old also had a difficult time

Using her voice: The therapist stressed that she wants people to know that having dyslexia does not mean you are unintelligent

Candid: Fleming admitted that she spent most of her life feeling like she wasn’t smart, saying: ‘I wish more time was spent on my strengths than my struggles’

‘I often skip over big words and use context clues to figure out their meaning or recognize them.

The therapist stressed that she wants people to know that having dyslexia does not mean you are unintelligent. She admitted that she spent most of her life feeling like she wasn’t smart.  

‘One thing I wish my team did for me growing up was to explain what dyslexia was and how my brain worked,’ she said.  ‘I wish more time was spent on my strengths than my struggles.

‘Teachers can help their dyslexic students by knowing what dyslexia looks like and advocating for their students if they feel they are showing signs,’ she added. ‘As for peers, I think continuing education about all disabilities is important.’

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